Psychology

The purpose of psychology is to give us a completely different idea of the things we know best.
Paul Valery
SELECT YOUR LEVEL

University


The Psychology, Biology and Politics of Food

by Yale

This course encompasses the study of eating as it affects the health and well-being of every human. Topics include taste preferences, food aversions, the regulation of hunger and satiety, food as comfort and friendship, eating as social ritual, and social norms of blame for food problems. The politics of food discusses issues such as sustainable agriculture, organic farming, genetically modified foods, nutrition policy, and the influence of food and agriculture industries. Also examined are problems such as malnutrition, eating disorders, and the global obesity epidemic; the impact of food advertising aimed at children; poverty and food; and how each individual's eating is affected by the modern environment.


Natural Science II: Brain and Behavior

by NYU

The relationship of the bran to behavior, beginning with the basic elements that make up the nervous system and how electrical and chemical signals in the brain work to effect behavior. Using this foundation, we examine how the brain learns and how it creates new behaviors, together with the brain mechanisms that are involved in sensory experience, movement, hunger and thirst, sexual behaviors, the experience of emotions, perception and cognition, memory and the brain's plasticity. Other key topics include whether certain behavioral disorders like schizophrenia and bipolar disorder can be accounted for by changes in the function of the brain, and how drugs can alter behavior and brain function.


Introduction to Psychology (MIT)

by MIT

This course is a survey of the scientific study of human nature, including how the mind works, and how the brain supports the mind. Topics include the mental and neural bases of perception, emotion, learning, memory, cognition, child development, personality, psychopathology, and social interaction. Students will consider how such knowledge relates to debates about nature and nurture, free will, consciousness, human differences, self, and society.


Statistics For The Behavioral Sciences

by NYU

This course provides students with the basic tools for evaluating data from studies in the behavioral sciences, particularly psychology. Students will gain familiarity with data description, variance and variability, significance tests, confidence intervals, correlation and linear regression, analysis of variance, and other related topics. The goal is to learn the application of statistical reasoning to decision making. Current events are often used to illustrate these issues.


Introduction to Psychology

by Yale

What do your dreams mean? Do men and women differ in the nature of their sexual desires? Can apes learn sign language? Why can't we tickle ourselves? This course tries to answer these questions and many others, providing a comprehensive overview of the scientific study of thought and behavior. It explores topics such as perception, communication, learning , memory, decision-making, religion, persuasion, love, lust, hunger, art, fiction, and dreams.We will look how these aspects of the mind develop in children, how they differ across people, how they are wire-up in the brain, and how they break down due to illness and injury.


Communication and Conflict in Couples and Families

by UCLA

Professors Benjamin Karney and Thomas Bradbury lecture on families and couples. This course examines relationships and their connection to individual psychopathology, marital discord, and family disruption.


Introduction to General Psychology

by Berkeley

Introduction to the principal areas, problems, and concepts of psychology.