Political Science

Man is by nature a political animal.
Aristotle
TRENDING BUBBLES

by Paula Goldman

Political Science

by Mark Sawyer

Political Science

by Steven B. Smith

Political Science

SELECT YOUR LEVEL

University


Talks from Princeton, Woodrow Wilson School

by Princeton

Talks from Princeton's Woodrow School.


The Moral Foundations of Politics

by Yale

This course explores main answers to the question, "When do governments deserve our allegiance?" It starts with a survey of major political theories of the Enlightenment—Utilitarianism, Marxism, and the social contract tradition—through classical formulations, historical context, and contemporary debates relating to politics today. It then turns to the rejection of Enlightenment political thinking. Lastly, it deals with the nature of, and justifications for, democratic politics, and their relations to Enlightenment and Anti-Enlightenment political thinking. Practical implications of these arguments are covered through discussion of a variety of concrete problems.


Capitalism; Success, Crisis and Reform

by Yale

In this course, we will seek to interpret capitalism using ideas from biological evolution: firms pursuing varied strategies and facing extinction when those strategies fail are analogous to organisms struggling for survival in nature. For this reason, it is less concerned with ultimate judgment of capitalism than with the ways it can be shaped to fit our more specific objectives – for the natural environment, public health, alleviation of poverty, and development of human potential in every child. Each book we read will be explicitly or implicitly an argument about good and bad consequences of capitalism.


Presidential Politics Race, Class, Faith and Gender in the 2008 Election

by Stanford

The 2008 U.S. Presidential Election is unprecedented. The nomination process and ongoing campaigns have revealed the complexities of identity and its role in uniting and dividing the electorate. This course explores how issues of race, class, faith and gender have shaped the candidates, campaigns, and our society. The course analysis spans the presidential race from the announcements of more than ten presidential hopefuls to the current competition between Senators Obama and McCain.


Introduction to Political Philosophy

by Yale

This course is intended as an introduction to political philosophy as seen through an examination of some of the major texts and thinkers of the Western political tradition. Three broad themes that are central to understanding political life are focused upon: the polis experience ( Plato, Aristotle), the sovereign state ( Machiavelli, Hobbes), constitutional government ( Locke), and democracy ( Rousseau, Tocqueville). The way in which different political philosophies have given expression to various forms of political institutions and our ways of life are examined throughout the course.


African American Studies

by UCLA

An intensive introduction to African American political thought that focuses on major ideological trends and political philosophies as they have been applied and interpreted by African Americans. Elements of the class include debates and conflicts in black political thought, historical contest of African American social movements, and discussions of the relationship between black political thought and major trends in Western thought. Mark Sawyer is an Associate Professor of African American Studies and Political Science at UCLA and the Director of the Center for the Study of Race, Ethnicity and Politics. He also has interest in the area of race, immigration and citizenship around the globe. He is a member of the American Political Science Association, and the National Conference of Black Political Scientists.


Geography of United States Elections

by Stanford

Led by Martin Lewis, this map-intensive course will explore the geography of US elections (both past and present), and challenge the suggestion that we are simply divided into a Red America and Blue America. Its really much more complicated than that.


Current Issues in International and Area Studies

by Berkeley

This course provides an opportunity to study and discuss issues and events having recent international impact and/or interest. The course will present a multidisciplinary perspective on specific subjects with the intent of linking students with the scholars and scholarship involved in understanding and explaining current international issues, events, and crisis.