Philosophy

Wonder is the feeling of the philosopher, and philosophy begins in wonder.
Plato
TRENDING BUBBLES

by Michael Sandel

Philosophy

by Michael Sandel

Philosophy

by Michael Sandel

Philosophy

by Michael Sandel

Philosophy

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University


Kant`s Critique of Pure Reason

by University of Oxford

Lecture series examining Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. It remains a matter of controversy as to just what the central project of the Critique is, but surely one objective is to establish the character and range of objective knowledge in light of the limits of sense and reason. Lectures are intended to clarify the major claims advanced by Kant in this connection, and to test the arguments he adduces in their support.


Hume`s Central Principles

by University of Oxford

Second Series on David Hume and his Philosophy. Focusing on his central principles in philosophy including Hume's theory on Ideas, Psychology, Logic, Relations, Induction and Causal Necessity


Bioethics: An Introduction

by University of Oxford

An introductory series by Marianne Talbot exploring bioethical theories and their philosophical foundations. These podcasts will explain key moral theories, common moral arguments, and some background logic. This series accompanies Bioethics: An Introduction (CUP, 2012) http://amzn.to/HZQwbS


Environmental Philosophy

by University of Notre Dame

The aim of this course is to enable participants to bring together materials from various disciplines bearing on our current environmental crisis, and from this integrated perspective to evaluate possible ways in which the crisis might be resolved. Disciplines to be consulted include ecology, thermodynamics, economics, value theory, and environmental history, among others. This project will rely on the integrative skills of philosophy to discern how materials from these disparate sources fit together.


Philosophy and the Science of Human Nature

by Yale

Philosophy and the Science of Human Nature pairs central texts from Western philosophical tradition (including works by Plato, Aristotle, Epictetus, Hobbes, Kant, Mill, Rawls, and Nozick) with recent findings in cognitive science and related fields. The course is structured around three intertwined sets of topics: Happiness and Flourishing; Morality and Justice; and Political Legitimacy and Social Structures.


A Romp Through Ethics

by University of Oxford

In this introduction to ethics, we shall be considering the underpinnings of ethical thought. We shall consider, for example, what it is for an action to be right or wrong, whether we can have moral knowledge and whether freewill is essential to morality. We shall reflect on four key ethical theories (virtue ethics, deontology, non-cognitivism and utilitarianism), looking at both their strengths and their weaknesses. We shall be looking at morality in the context of the individual and the context of society.


Justice: What is the Right Thing to Do?

by Harvard

Justice is one of the most popular courses in Harvard's history, having taught more than 14,000 students over the course of two decades.In this course, Sandel challenges us with difficult moral dilemmas and asks our opinion about the right thing to do. He then asks us to examine our answers in the light of new scenarios. The results are often surprising, revealing that important moral questions are never black and white.This course also addresses the hot topics of our day-affirmative action, same-sex marriage, patriotism and rights-and Sandel shows us that we can revisit familiar controversies with a fresh perspective. Each lecture in this course has two parts as well as related readings and discussion guides.


General Philosophy

by University of Oxford

A series of lectures delivered by Peter Millican to first-year philosophy students at the University of Oxford. The lectures comprise the 8-week General Philosophy course and were delivered in late 2009.


Critical Reasoning for Beginners

by University of Oxford

Are you confident you can reason clearly? Are you able to convince others of your point of view? Are you able to give plausible reasons for believing what you believe? Do you sometimes read arguments in the newspapers, hear them on the television, or in the pub and wish you knew how to confidently evaluate them? In this six-part course, you will learn all about arguments, how to identify them, how to evaluate them, and how not to mistake bad arguments for good. Such skills are invaluable if you are concerned about the truth of your beliefs, and the cogency of your arguments


Death

by Yale

There is one thing I can be sure of: I am going to die. But what am I to make of that fact? This course will examine a number of issues that arise once we begin to reflect on our mortality. The possibility that death may not actually be the end is considered. Are we, in some sense, immortal? Would immortality be desirable? Also a clearer notion of what it is to die is examined. What does it mean to say that a person has died? What kind of fact is that? And, finally, different attitudes to death are evaluated. Is death an evil? How? Why? Is suicide morally permissible? Is it rational? How should the knowledge that I am going to die affect the way I live my life?