Materials Science and Engineering

Successfully engineering is all about understanding how things break or fail.
Hnery Petroski
TRENDING BUBBLES

by Bernhard J Wuensch

Materials Science and Engineering

by Gerbrand Ceder

Materials Science and Engineering

by Gerbrand Ceder

Materials Science and Engineering

by Klaus Jurgen Bathe

Materials Science and Engineering

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University


Introduction to Modeling and Simulation

by MIT

This subject provides an introduction to modeling and simulation, covering continuum methods, atomistic and molecular simulation, and quantum mechanics. Hands-on training is provided in the fundamentals and applications of these methods to key engineering problems. The lectures provide exposure to areas of application based on the scientific exploitation of the power of computation. We use web based applets for simulations, thus extensive programming skills are not required.


Nuclear Systems Design Project

by MIT

This capstone course is a group design project involving integration of nuclear physics, particle transport, control, heat transfer, safety, instrumentation, materials, environmental impact, and economic optimization. It provides opportunities to synthesize knowledge acquired in nuclear and non-nuclear subjects and apply this knowledge to practical problems of current interest in nuclear applications design. Each year, the class takes on a different design project; this year, the project is a power plant design that ties together the creation of emission-free electricity with carbon sequestration and fossil fuel displacement. Some lectures are missing due to copyright restrictions.


Finite Element Procedures for Solids and Structures: Nonlinear Analysis

by MIT

This video series presents effective finite element procedures for the nonlinear analysis of solids and structures. The finite element method is the ideal tool for solving complex static and dynamic problems in engineering and the sciences. Nonlinear analysis models kinematic and/or materially nonlinear effects.In these videos, Professor K. J. Bathe, a researcher of world renown in the field of finite element analysis, builds upon the concepts developed in his previous video course on Linear Analysis. General nonlinear analysis techniques are presented by emphasizing physical concepts. The mathematical foundation of nonlinear finite element techniques is given in light of these physical requirements. A wide range of questions in engineering and the sciences can be addressed with these methods.


Finite Element Procedures for Solids and Structures: Linear Analysis

by MIT

This video series is a comprehensive course of study that presents effective finite element procedures for the linear analysis of solids and structures. The finite element method is the ideal tool for solving static and dynamic problems in engineering and the sciences. Linear analysis assumes linear elastic behavior and infinitesimally small displacements and strains. To establish appropriate models for analysis, it is necessary to become familiar with the finite element methods available.In these videos, Professor K. J. Bathe, a researcher of world renown in the field of finite element analysis, teaches the basic principles used for effective finite element analysis, describes the general assumptions, and discusses the implementation of finite element procedures.


Atomistic Computer Modeling of Materials

by MIT

This course uses the theory and application of atomistic computer simulations to model, understand, and predict the properties of real materials. Specific topics include: energy models from classical potentials to first-principles approaches; density functional theory and the total-energy pseudopotential method; errors and accuracy of quantitative predictions: thermodynamic ensembles, Monte Carlo sampling and molecular dynamics simulations; free energy and phase transitions; fluctuations and transport properties; and coarse-graining approaches and mesoscale models. The course employs case studies from industrial applications of advanced materials to nanotechnology. Several laboratories will give students direct experience with simulations of classical force fields, electronic-structure approaches, molecular dynamics, and Monte Carlo.


Symmetry, Structure, and Tensor Properties of Materials

by MIT

This course covers the derivation of symmetry theory; lattices, point groups, space groups, and their properties; use of symmetry in tensor representation of crystal properties, including anisotropy and representation surfaces; and applications to piezoelectricity and elasticity.