Economics

Economics is everywhere, and understanding it can help you make better decisions and lead a happier life.
Tyler Cowen
TRENDING BUBBLES

by Salman Khan

Economics

by Salman Khan

Economics

by Salman Khan

Economics

by Benjamin Polak

Economics

SELECT YOUR LEVEL

University


Development Economics: Macroeconomics

by MIT

This course emphasizes dynamic models of growth and development. Topics covered include: migration, modernization, and technological change; static and dynamic models of political economy; the dynamics of income distribution and institutional change; firm structure in developing countries; development, transparency, and functioning of financial markets; privatization; and banks and credit market institutions in emerging markets. At MIT, this course was team taught by Prof. Robert Townsend, who taught for the first half of the semester, and Prof. Abhijit Banerjee, who taught during the second half. On OCW we are only including materials associated with sessions one through 13, which comprise the first half of the class.


Public Economics

by Harvard

This is the first of two courses in the graduate public economics sequence at Harvard. This one-semester course covers basic issues in the optimal design of tax and social insurance policies, with emphasis on combining theoretical models with empirical evidence. Topics include efficiency costs and incidence of taxation, income taxation, transfer and welfare programs, public goods and externalities, optimal social insurance (excluding social security), and welfare analysis in behavioral models.


Human Capital and Intergeneration Mobility

by University of Chicago

This series of lectures recorded during the Spring of 2010 are from ECON 343 - Human Capital, a class taught every year by Gary Becker at the University of Chicago. In this class, Becker expounds upon the theory of Human Capital that he helped create and for which he won the Nobel Prize. Please see attached lecture notes, video annotations, and reading list for more information.


Energy Decisions, Markets and Policies

by MIT

This course examines the choices and constraints regarding sources and uses of energy by households, firms, and governments through a number of frameworks to describe and explain behavior at various levels of aggregation. Examples include a wide range of countries, scope, settings, and analytical approaches. This course is one of many OCW Energy Courses, and it is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges. Please note that Lecture 7: Climate Agreement Negotiations I, an in-class activity that took place for the duration of the class session, is not included in this collection.


The Challenge of World Poverty

by MIT

This is a course for those who are interested in the challenge posed by massive and persistent world poverty, and are hopeful that economists might have something useful to say about this challenge. The questions we will take up include: Is extreme poverty a thing of the past? What is economic life like when living under a dollar per day? Why do some countries grow fast and others fall further behind? Does growth help the poor? Are famines unavoidable? How can we end child labor—or should we? How do we make schools work for poor citizens? How do we deal with the disease burden? Is micro finance invaluable or overrated? Without property rights, is life destined to be "nasty, brutish and short"? Has globalization been good to the poor? Should we leave economic development to the market? Should we leave economic development to non-governmental organizations (NGOs)? Does foreign aid help or hinder? Where is the best place to intervene?


The Element of Economic Analysis

by University of Chicago

The first part of this course discusses markets with one or a few suppliers. The second part focuses on demand and supply for factors of production and the distribution of income in the economy. This course also includes some elementary general equilibrium theory and welfare economics.


Microeconomics

by Khan Academy

Topics covered in a traditional college level introductory microeconomics course


Introduction to Environmental Economics and Policy

by Berkeley

Introduction to microeconomics with emphasis on resource, agricultural, and environmental issues.Lecture 2 is unavailable due to copyright restrictions.


Principles of Microeconomics

by MIT

Principles of Microeconomics is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester.


1909: The Peoples Budget

by University of Oxford

Presentations and lectures from the 1909 People's Budget Symposium, held in October, 2009 on Lloyd George's landmark budget in 1909, which gave way to significant social reforms.


Game Theory

by Yale

This course is an introduction to game theory and strategic thinking. Ideas such as dominance, backward induction, Nash equilibrium, evolutionary stability, commitment, credibility, asymmetric information, adverse selection, and signaling are discussed and applied to games played in class and to examples drawn from economics, politics, the movies, and elsewhere.


Introduction to Economics

by Berkeley

Introduction to basic principles of economics by professor Ken Train of the University of California, Berkeley.


Paulson Bailout

by Khan Academy

Videos to help understand the bailout.


Geithner Plan

by Khan Academy

Videos on the Geithner Plan to solve the banking crisis.


Current Economics

by Khan Academy

Discussions of economic topics and how they relate to current events.


Credit Crisis

by Khan Academy

Videos on the causes and effects of the credit crisis/crunch.


Banking and Money

by Khan Academy

Videos on how banks work and how money is created.


Politics, Strategy, and Game Theory

by UCLA

This course is an introduction to study of strategic interaction in political applications. Use of game theory and other formal modeling strategies to understand politics are also studied in order to gain a better understanding of politics at large.


Starcraft Theory and Strategy

by Berkeley

This course will go in-depth in the theory of how war is conducted within the confines of the game Starcraft. There will be lecture on various aspects of the game, from the viewpoint of pure theory to the more computational aspects of how exactly battles are conducted. Calculus and Differential Equations are highly recommended for full understanding of the course. 

Furthermore, the class will take the theoretical into the practical world by analyzing games and replays to reinforce decision-making skills and advanced Starcraft theory.

As a prerequisite, students should be familiar with all units and some basic StarCraft strategy.

Additional lectures will be added throughout the Spring of 2009 as they are made available.


Currency

by Khan Academy

Videos about currency exchange.