Computer Science

Computer science is no more about computers than astronomy is about telescopes.
Edsger Dijkastra
TRENDING BUBBLES

by David J. Malan

Computer Science

by Mehran Sahami

Computer Science

by Eric Grimsom

Computer Science

by Eric Grimsom

Computer Science

SELECT YOUR LEVEL

University


Creating Video Games

by MIT

Creating Video Games is a class that introduces students to the complexities of working in small, multidisciplinary teams to develop video games. Students will learn creative design and production methods, working together in small teams to design, develop, and thoroughly test their own original digital games. Design iteration across all aspects of video game development (game design, audio design, visual aesthetics, fiction and programming) will be stressed. Students will also be required to focus test their games, and will need to support and challenge their game design decisions with appropriate focus testing and data analysis. Lecture 21 is unavailable due to copyright restrictions.


Computer Systems Security

by MIT

Computer Systems Security is a class about the design and implementation of secure computer systems. Lectures cover threat models, attacks that compromise security, and techniques for achieving security, based on recent research papers. Topics include operating system (OS) security, capabilities, information flow control, language security, network protocols, hardware security, and security in web applications.


Developing iOS 8 Apps with Swift

by Stanford

Updated for iOS 8 and Swift. Tools and APIs required to build application for the iPhone and iPad platforms using the iOS SDK. User interface design for mobile devices and unique user interactions using multi-touch technologies. Object-oriented design using model-view-controller paradigm, memory management, Swift programming language. Other topics include: animation, mobile device power management, multi-threading, networking and performance considerations.


Developing iOS 7 Apps for iPhone and iPad

by Stanford

Updated for iOS 7. Tools and APIs required to build applications for the iPhone and iPad platform using the iOS SDK. User interface designs for mobile devices and unique user interactions using multi-touch technologies. Object-oriented design using model-view-controller paradigm, memory management, Objective-C programming language. Other topics include: object-oriented database API, animation, multi-threading and performance considerations.


Mathematics for Computer Science

by MIT

This course covers elementary discrete mathematics for computer science and engineering. It emphasizes mathematical definitions and proofs as well as applicable methods. Topics include formal logic notation, proof methods; induction, well-ordering; sets, relations; elementary graph theory; integer congruences; asymptotic notation and growth of functions; permutations and combinations, counting principles; discrete probability. Further selected topics may also be covered, such as recursive definition and structural induction; state machines and invariants; recurrences; generating functions.


Introduction to MATLAB Programming

by MIT

This course is intended to assist undergraduates with learning the basics of programming in general and programming MATLAB in particular.


Essential Numerical Methods; Octave and MATLAB for Beginners

by MIT

This half-semester course introduces computational methods for solving physical problems, especially in nuclear applications. The course covers ordinary and partial differential equations for particle orbit, and fluid, field, and particle conservation problems; their representation and solution by finite difference numerical approximations; iterative matrix inversion methods; stability, convergence, accuracy and statistics; and particle representations of Boltzmann's equation and methods of solution such as Monte-Carlo and particle-in-cell techniques.


The Battlecode Programming Competition

by MIT

This course is conducted as an artificial intelligence programming contest in Java. Students work in teams to program virtual robots to play Battlecode, a real-time strategy game. Optional lectures are provided on topics and programming practices relevant to the game, and students learn and improve their programming skills experientially. The competition culminates in a live Battlecode tournament. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.


Artificial Intelligence

by MIT

This course introduces students to the basic knowledge representation, problem solving, and learning methods of artificial intelligence. Upon completion of 6.034, students should be able to develop intelligent systems by assembling solutions to concrete computational problems; understand the role of knowledge representation, problem solving, and learning in intelligent-system engineering; and appreciate the role of problem solving, vision, and language in understanding human intelligence from a computational perspective.


Advanced Data Structures

by MIT

Data structures play a central role in modern computer science. You interact with data structures even more often than with algorithms (think Google, your mail server, and even your network routers). In addition, data structures are essential building blocks in obtaining efficient algorithms. This course covers major results and current directions of research in data structure.


System Validation

by TU Delft

The purpose of this course is to learn how to specify the behavior of embedded systems and to experience the design of a provably correct system. In this course you will learn how to formally specify requirements and to prove (or disprove) them on the behaviour. With a practical assignment you will experience how to apply the techniques in practice.


iPad and iPhone Application Development

by Stanford

Updated for iOS 5. Tools and APIs required to build applications for the iPhone and iPad platform using the iOS SDK. User interface designs for mobile devices and unique user interactions using multi-touch technologies. Object-oriented design using model-view-controller paradigm, memory management, Objective-C programming language. Other topics include: object-oriented database API, animation, multi-threading and performance considerations. Prerequisites: C language and programming experience at the level of 106B (Programming Abstractions) or X. Recommended: UNIX, object-oriented programming, graphical toolkits


Machine Learning (Caltech)

by Caltech

This is an introductory course by Caltech Professor Yaser Abu-Mostafa on machine learning that covers the basic theory, algorithms, and applications. Machine learning (ML) enables computational systems to adaptively improve their performance with experience accumulated from the observed data. ML techniques are widely applied in engineering, science, finance, and commerce to build systems for which we do not have full mathematical specification (and that covers a lot of systems). The course balances theory and practice, and covers the mathematical as well as the heuristic aspects.


Human~Computer Interaction Seminar

by Stanford

Seminars on people, computers and design by Stanford university.


The Beauty and Joy of Computing

by Berkeley

An introduction to the beauty and joy of computing. The history, social implications, great principles, and future of computing. Beautiful applications that have changed the world. How computing empowers discovery and progress in other fields. Relevance of computing to the student and society will be emphasized.


XML with Java, Java Servlet, and JSP

by Harvard

This course introduces XML as a key enabling technology in Java-based applications. Students learn the fundamentals of XML and its derivatives, including DTD, SVG, XML Schema, XPath, XQuery, XSL-FO, and XSLT. Students also gain experience with programmatic interfaces to XML like SAX and DOM, standard APIs like JAXP and TrAX, and industry-standard software like Ant, Tomcat, Xerces, and Xalan. The course acquaints students with J2EE, including JavaServer Pages (JSP) and Java Servlet, and also explores HTTP, SOAP, web services, and WSDL. The course's projects focus on the implementation and deployment of these technologies.


Computer Science II; Programming Abstractions

by Stanford

Note: This course is being offered by Stanford this summer as an online course for credit. It can be taken individually, or as part of a master’s degree or graduate certificate earned online through the Stanford Center for Professional Development.This course is the natural successor to Programming Methodology and covers such advanced programming topics as recursion, algorithmic analysis, and data abstraction using the C++ programming language, which is similar to both C and Java. If you've taken the Computer Science AP exam and done well (scored 4 or 5) or earned a good grade in a college course, Programming Abstractions may be an appropriate course for you to start with, but often Programming Abstractions (Accelerated) is a better choice. Programming Abstractions assumes that you already have familiarity with good programming style and software engineering issues (at the level of Programming Methodology), and that you can use this understanding as a foundation on which to tackle new topics in programming and data abstraction. Topics: Abstraction and its relation to programming. Software engineering principles of data abstraction and modularity. Object-oriented programming, fundamental data structures (such as stacks, queues, sets) and data-directed design. Recursion and recursive data structures (linked lists, trees, graphs). Introduction to time and space complexity analysis. Uses the programming language C++ covering its basic facilities.Prerequisites: Solid performance in Programming Methodology and readiness to move on to advanced programming topics. A comparable introductory programming course (including high school AP courses) is often a reasonable substitute for our Programming Methodology.


iPhone Application Programming

by Stanford

Tools and APIs required to build applications for the iPhone platform using the iPhone SDK. User interface designs for mobile devices and unique user interactions using multitouch technologies. Object-oriented design using model-view-controller pattern, memory management, Objective-C programming language. iPhone APIs and tools including Xcode, Interface Builder and Instruments on Mac OS X. Other topics include: core animation, bonjour networking, mobile device power management and performance considerations. Prerequisites: C language and programming experience at the level of 106B or X. Recommended: UNIX, object-oriented programming, graphical toolkits Offered by Stanford’s School of Engineering, the course will last ten weeks and include both the lecture videos and PDF documents. A new lecture will be posted a week after each class meeting.


Understanding Computers and the Internet

by Harvard

This course is all about understanding: understanding what's going on inside your computer when you flip on the switch, why tech support has you constantly rebooting your computer, how everything you do on the Internet can be watched by others, and how your computer can become infected with a worm just by turning it on. In this course we demystify computers and the Internet, along with their jargon, so that students understand not only what they can do with each but also how it all works and why. Students leave this course armed with a new vocabulary and equipped for further exploration of computers and the Internet. Topics include hardware, software, the Internet, multimedia, security, website development, programming, and dotcoms. This course is designed both for those with little, if any, computer experience and for those who use a computer every day.


Machine Learning

by Stanford

Note: This course is offered by Stanford as an online course for credit. It can be taken individually, or as part of a master’s degree or graduate certificate earned online through the Stanford Center for Professional Development.

This course provides a broad introduction to machine learning and statistical pattern recognition.

Topics include: supervised learning (generative/discriminative learning, parametric/non-parametric learning, neural networks, support vector machines); unsupervised learning (clustering, dimensionality reduction, kernel methods); learning theory (bias/variance tradeoffs; VC theory; large margins); reinforcement learning and adaptive control.

The course will also discuss recent applications of machine learning, such as robotic control, data mining, autonomous navigation, bioinformatics, speech recognition, and text and web data processing.

Prerequisites: Knowledge of basic computer science principles and skills, at a level sufficient to write a reasonably non-trivial computer program; familiarity with basic probability theory; familiarity with basic linear algebra.


Introduction to Computer Science and Programming

by MIT

This subject is aimed at students with little or no programming experience. It aims to provide students with an understanding of the role computation can play in solving problems. It also aims to help students, regardless of their major, to feel justifiably confident of their ability to write small programs that allow them to accomplish useful goals. The class will use the Python™ programming language.


Computer Science III; Programming Paradigms

by Stanford

Topics include: Advanced memory management features of C and C++; the differences between imperative and object-oriented paradigms; the functional paradigm (using LISP) and concurrent programming (using C and C++); brief survey of other modern languages such as Python, Objective C, and C#.Prerequisites: Programming and problem solving at the Programming Abstractions level. Prospective students should know a reasonable amount of C++. You should be comfortable with arrays, pointers, references, classes, methods, dynamic memory allocation, recursion, linked lists, binary search trees, hashing, iterators, and function pointers. You should be able to write well-decomposed, easy-to-understand code, and understand the value that comes with good variable names, short function and method implementations, and thoughtful, articulate comments.


Computer Science I; Programming Methodology

by Stanford

Programming Methodology is the largest of the introductory programming courses and is one of the largest courses at Stanford. Topics focus on the introduction to the engineering of computer applications emphasizing modern software engineering principles: object-oriented design, decomposition, encapsulation, abstraction, and testing.Programming Methodology teaches the widely-used Java programming language along with good software engineering principles. Emphasis is on good programming style and the built-in facilities of the Java language. The course is explicitly designed to appeal to humanists and social scientists as well as hard-core techies. In fact, most Programming Methodology graduates end up majoring outside of the School of Engineering.


Operating Systems and System Programming

by Berkeley

Basic concepts of operating systems and system programming. Utility programs, subsystems, multiple-program systems. Processes, interprocess communication, and synchronization. Memory allocation, segmentation, paging. Loading and linking, libraries. Resource allocation, scheduling, performance evaluation. File systems, storage devices, I/O systems. Protection, security, and privacy.


The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs

by Berkeley

Introduction to programming and computer science. This course exposes students to techniques of abstraction at several levels: (a) within a programming language, using higher-order functions, manifest types, data-directed programming, and message-passing; (b) between programming languages, using functional and rule-based languages as examples. It also relates these techniques to the practical problems of implementation of languages and algorithms on a von Neumann machine. There are several significant programming projects, programmed in a dialect of the LISP language.


Introduction to Computer Science I

by Harvard

Introduction to Computer Science I is a first course in computer science at Harvard College for concentrators and non-concentrators alike. More than just teach you how to program, this course teaches you how to think more methodically and how to solve problems more effectively. As such, its lessons are applicable well beyond the boundaries of computer science itself. That the course does teach you how to program, though, is perhaps its most empowering return. With this skill comes the ability to solve real-world problems in ways and at speeds beyond the abilities of most humans.


Data Structures

by Berkeley

Fundamental dynamic data structures, including linear lists, queues, trees, and other linked structures; arrays strings, and hash tables. Storage management. Elementary principles of software engineering. Abstract data types. Algorithms for sorting and searching. Introduction to the Java programming language.


Introduction to Algorithms

by MIT

This course teaches techniques for the design and analysis of efficient algorithms, emphasizing methods useful in practice. Topics covered include: sorting; search trees, heaps, and hashing; divide-and-conquer; dynamic programming; amortized analysis; graph algorithms; shortest paths; network flow; computational geometry; number-theoretic algorithms; polynomial and matrix calculations; caching; and parallel computing.


Building Dynamic Websites

by Harvard

Today's websites are increasingly dynamic. Pages are no longer static HTML files but instead generated by scripts and database calls. User interfaces are more seamless, with technologies like Ajax replacing traditional page reloads. This course teaches students how to build dynamic websites with Ajax and with Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP ( LAMP), one of today's most popular frameworks. Students learn how to set up domain names with DNS, how to structure pages with XHTML and CSS, how to program in JavaScript and PHP, how to configure Apache and MySQL, how to design and query databases with SQL, how to use Ajax with both XML and JSON, and how to build mashups. The course explores issues of security, scalability, and cross-browser support and also discusses enterprise-level deployments of websites, including third-party hosting, virtualization, colocation in data centers, firewalling, and load-balancing.


Search Engines: Technology, Society and Business

by Berkeley

Search Engines: Technology, Society, and Business. The World Wide Web brings much of the world's knowledge into the reach of nearly everyone with a computer and an internet connection. The availability of huge quantities of information at our fingertips is transforming government, business, and many other aspects of society. Topics include search advertising and auctions, search and privacy, search ranking, internationalization, anti-spam efforts, local search, peer-to-peer search, and search of blogs and online communities.