Biology

Our world is built on biology and once we begin to understand it, it then becomes a technology.
Ryan Bethencourt
TRENDING BUBBLES

by Stephen C Stearns

Biology

by Stephen C Stearns

Biology

SELECT YOUR LEVEL

University


Foundations of Computational and Systems Biology

by MIT

This course is an introduction to computational biology emphasizing the fundamentals of nucleic acid and protein sequence and structural analysis; it also includes an introduction to the analysis of complex biological systems. Topics covered in the course include principles and methods used for sequence alignment, motif finding, structural modeling, structure prediction and network modeling, as well as currently emerging research areas.


Systems Biology

by MIT

This course provides an introduction to cellular and population-level systems biology with an emphasis on synthetic biology, modeling of genetic networks, cell-cell interactions, and evolutionary dynamics. Cellular systems include genetic switches and oscillators, network motifs, genetic network evolution, and cellular decision-making. Population-level systems include models of pattern formation, cell-cell communication, and evolutionary systems biology.


Tree of Life

by Khan Academy

This lecture series explains a basic view on human prehistory and covers basic information on species, bacteria and viruses.


Heredity and Genetics

by Khan Academy

Salman Khan introduces with 8 brief video lectures the biological phenomena of heredity and genetics.


Cellular Respiration

by Khan Academy

Introduction to the biological procedure of cellular respiration.


Human Biology

by Khan Academy

This course describes in detail the human biology and is divided into four sections. The first section is about circulatory and pulmonary systems (Lectures 1-4). As humans, we really like breathing oxygen. That's because the cells in our body will die if they don't get oxygen to function in a reasonable amount of time. This tutorials describes how we use the lungs to exchange gasses between our blood and the atmosphere and how the oxygen is then pumped through the body by way of blood and the circulatory system. The second section refers to the neurone and nervous system (Lectures 5-10). Neurons are the primary way that our bodies transmit signals from one part to another quickly. In this tutorial, we'll explore the anatomy of a neuron and the mechanism by which a signal is actually transmitted through one. The third section talks about the kidney and nephron (Lecture 11-12). How do we get unwanted substances out of our blood? Through the kidney. This tutorial goes into some detail to describe just how this happens. The fourth and final section focuses on muscles (Lectures 13-16). Without muscles, we wouldn't be able to do much of anything. This tutorial begins to explore what muscle cells are and how they contract in order to move our bodies (or do things like breath and pump blood).


Photosynthesis

by Khan Academy

Salman Khan discusses about one of the most important biological phenomena, photosynthesis, which is the process by which various organisms and plants convert light energy into chemical compositions/energy in order to create oxygen.


Cells and Cell Division

by Khan Academy

Salman Khan explains the basics principles and functions of cells and cell division.


Evolution and Natural Selection

by Khan Academy

Salman Khan gives an introduction to evolution, natural selection and the DNA.


Immunology

by Khan Academy

In this course, Salman Khan talks about immunology and immune responses of cells.


Summer Science Seminar

by Stanford

The Stanford Summer Science Lecture Series is a series of outdoor science and engineering lectures offered on campus four or five evenings throughout the summer by some of Stanford's most distinguished professors.


Introductory Biology with Applications

by MIT

The MIT Biology Department core courses all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasised and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.This course focuses on the application of these fundamental principles, toward an understanding of microorganisms as geochemical agents responsible for the evolution and renewal of the biosphere and of their role in human health and disease.


Fundamentals of Biology

by MIT

Fundamentals of Biology focuses on the basic principles of biochemistry, molecular biology, genetics, and recombinant DNA. These principles are necessary to understanding the basic mechanisms of life and anchor the biological knowledge that is required to understand many of the challenges in everyday life, from human health and disease to loss of biodiversity and environmental quality.


Human Behavior Biology

by Stanford

This course is offered by Stanford University and covers how to approach complex normal and abnormal behaviors through biology. How to integrate disciplines including sociobiology, ethology, neuroscience, and endocrinology to examine behaviors such as aggression, sexual behavior, language use, and mental illness.


Genomes and Diversity

by NYU

Millions of species of animals, plants and microbes inhabit our planet. Genomics, the study of all the genes in an organism, is providing new insights into this amazing diversity of life on Earth. We begin with the fundamentals of DNA, genes and genomes. We then explore microbial diversity, with an emphasis on how genomics can reveal many aspects of organisms, from their ancient history to their physiological and ecological habits. We follow with examinations of animal and plant diversity, focusing on domesticated species, such as dogs and tomatoes, as examples of how genomic methods can be used to identify genes that underlie new or otherwise interesting traits. Genomics has also transformed the study of human diversity and human disease. We examine the use of DNA to trace human ancestry, as well as the use of genomics as a diagnostic tool in medicine. With the powerful new technologies to study genomes has come an increased power to manipulate them. We conclude by considering the societal implications of this ability to alter the genomes of crop plants, livestock and potentially humans.Lecture 19 is not available due to copyright restrictions.


Principles of Evolution, Ecology and Behavior

by Yale

This course presents the principles of evolution, ecology, and behavior for students beginning their study of biology and of the environment. It discusses major ideas and results in a manner accessible to all Yale College undergraduates. Recent advances have energized these fields with results that have implications well beyond their boundaries: ideas, mechanisms, and processes that should form part of the toolkit of all biologists and educated citizens.


General Human Anatomy

by Berkeley

The functional anatomy of the human body as revealed by gross and microscopic examination.


Molecular Biology; Macromolecular Synthesis and Cellular Function

by Berkeley

Molecular biology of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and their viruses. Mechanisms of DNA replication, transcription, translation. Structure of genes and chromosomes. Regulation of gene expression. Biochemical processes and principles in membrane structure and function, intracellular trafficking and subcellular compartmentation, cytoskeletal architecture, nucleocytoplasmic transport, signal transduction mechanisms, and cell cycle control.


Neuroscience Lab

by UCLA

Psychology 116: Neuroscience Lab is a laboratory experience exploring various topics in behavioral neuroscience. 

 Dr. William Grisham is a Professor from UCLAs Department of Physiological Science. Since July of 1996, Dr. Grisham coordinated and taught upper division laboratories in Interdepartmental Program in Neuroscience and Biopsychology majors for UCLA. Furthermore, he participated in selection and development of laboratory exercises and computer assisted learning, developed and administered laboratory examinations, and trained and supervised graduate teaching assistants. 

 Note: Some clips and images may have been blurred or removed to avoid copyright infringement.


Introduction to Biology with Research Focus

by MIT

The MIT Biology Department core courses all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, this course focuses on the exploration of current research in cell biology, immunology, neurobiology, genomics, and molecular medicine.


Introduction to Life and Sciences

by UCLA

A General Education Course introducing non- Life Science Majors to the Life Sciences, challenging them to explore and understand important issues in the field. Topics include chemistry of life, genetics, physiology, evolution, and ecology -- all explored in lecture and debates.Professor Jay Phelan has a Ph.D. in Biology from Harvard, and masters and bachelors degrees from UCLA and Yale. Some clips and images may have been blurred or removed to avoid copyright infringement.


Introduction to Oceanography

by UCLA

Earth & Space Science 15: Introduction to Oceanography is a class that provides a general introduction to geological, physical, chemical, and biological processes and history of Earth's global oceanic system. 

 Edwin Schauble is an Associate Professor from UCLAs Department of Geochemistry and Astrobiology. His current area of study and collaboration include species-dependent isotopic signatures in dissolved iron, spectroscopic signatures and thermodynamic properties of dissolved silica, non-mass dependent isotopic fractionation in heavy elements, calibration of the 13C-18O clumping paleothermometer, and the possibility of silicon as an alloying element in the Earths core.


General Biology Laboratory

by Berkeley

Laboratory that accompanies UC Berkeley General Biology I lecture course, which covers cell structure and function, molecular and organismal genetics, animal development, form and function.


General Biology II

by Berkeley

General introduction to plant development, form, and function; population genetics, ecology, and evolution.


General Biology I

by Berkeley

General introduction to cell structure and function, molecular and organismal genetics, animal development, form and function.